Our beginners guide to crochet thread

Crochet Thread Guide for Beginners

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When you start learning to crochet one of the first choices you must make is that of the type of “yarn” you will use. After you become more familiar with the basics of crochet, you may want to make something that is more intricate, detailed, or delicate, than you can make with thicker yarns. Yes, you can use some thinner yarns, such as sport (size 2), superfine/baby (size1) or lace (size 0), but, what if you need something thinner, for example, for a doily. That is when you switch, from yarn, to what is called crochet thread.

crochet thread and hook scaled
Crochet Thread and Hook

If you want to learn more about crochet thread, see our blog post: What is Crochet Thread?

For more information about the differences between yarn and thread, see our blog post: Crochet Thread vs Yarn – what’s the difference?

Misconceptions

Probably the most common misconception about crochet thread is that it is difficult to use. That is simply not true. Working with thread is the same as working with yarn. The only real difference is that thread is thinner, and the hooks are smaller. Other than that, you use the same skills you used when working with yarn.

Another misconception is that thread is hard on the hands. While working with thinner material and smaller hooks may take a little getting use to, it is no harder on the hands than working with a thinner yarn. To make the transition easier start with a larger thread, say size 3, and then move down to the thinner sizes as you grow more comfortable.

Finally, you often hear that crochet thread is only for doilies. That is not true. You can use crochet thread to make almost thing that you make with yarn. The benefit of crochet thread is that the smaller size allows for more intricate stitches giving you the ability to create objects with exceptionally fine details. One of my favorite uses for crochet thread is for making flowers. I have created Roses, Gladiolus, Carnations, Poppies, and many other flower designs using crochet thread.

The basics

Thread Size

 The first thing to know about crochet thread is that the sizing is different from yarn. With yarn, the larger the number, the thicker the yarn. With crochet thread the opposite it true. The larger the number, the thinner the thread. So basically, bigger is smaller and larger is thinner.

Thread Sizes
An illustration of different thread sizes

A size 20 crochet thread, say from Lizbeth, is much thinner than a size 3 from Aunt Lydia’s. When picking a thread for a pattern it is best to use the size recommended by the author. While it is possible to convert to a different size thread, we won’t cover that here.

For more information on thread size, see our blog post: What are the sizes of crochet thread? Check out our size guide.

Hook Size  

Like threads, the larger the size of the hook, the smaller the hook. In addition to the hooks being smaller they are typically made of steel. Called steel hooks, they are mostly used for working with thread.

Crochet Hooks
Steel Crochet Hooks

There are several styles of hook that you can use. Some are small steel hooks with no handles, others are made of steel but have a wooden, plastic or rubber handle. You don’t have to use the straight metal hooks, you can choose the handle type that you are most comfortable with.

For more information on hooks for crochet thread, see our blog post: Looking for the right hooks for your crochet thread? Check out this blog post.

Mercerized

One advantage of using crochet thread vs yarn is that that the threads have more vibrant colors. The color richness of the threads comes from the mercerization process, where the treads are specially treated to help the dyes better penetrate the fabric. Mercerization does not make the treads hard or coarse. The tread retain their softness which maintaining their vibrance.

Mercerized Crochet Thread
Mercerized Crochet Thread

To learn about the mercerization process, see our blog post:  Ever wonder what 100% mercerized cotton means? We have the answer right here.

Best projects

Now that you have the basics, what can you do with crochet thread? Well, you are only limited by your imagination. That said, there are certain projects that people then to think of when they think of crochet thread. Those include:

  • Doilies
  • Table Runners
  • Bookmarks
  • Shawls and Wraps

While these are all popular projects my favorite use of crochet thread is making flower decor. I use our Monaco size 8 thread and flora wire to create stunning flowers to decorate my home.

Looking for the 10 best projects for Crochet Thread Here they are
10 best projects for crochet threads

For more ideas about what you can do with crochet thread, see our blog post: Looking for the 10 best projects for crochet thread, here they are.

Best Brands

So now that you know the basics of crochet thread and have an idea of what you can do with it, which brand should you choose?

Well, the hands down, most popular brand of crochet thread is Aunt Lydia’s.  When you do a google search for crochet thread that is name that will, most likely, be at the top of the list and for good reason. Aunt Lydia’s is inexpensive, provides good yardage, and comes in a wide variety of colors. But it is not the only popular brand of crochet thread on the market.

Lizbeth is another popular brand of crochet thread. It comes in a wider variety of colors and range of sizes. While its most popular use is tatting is can also be used for crochet. Never heard of tatting, check out: Do you know what tatting is? What it is used for? We explain that and more in this post.

Our personal favorite is our Monaco brand crochet thread. Monaco crochet thread is imported from the Philippines. It is size 8, the only size 8 on the market I think, and comes in a wide variety of colors. Our Monaco brand is extremely popular and even the Monaco Thread Corporation in the Philippines list Lyn’s Crafts as a US supplier of Monaco threads.

Best Brands of Crochet Thread
Top 10 brands of crochet tread

For information of these and other brands of crochet threads, see our blog post: Looking for the 10 best brands of crochet thread. We have them right here.

Are all crochet threads cotton?

While all the threads we have discussed so far are cotton there is another type of crochet thread on the market: Flax Linen crochet thread. Our Flax Linen thread is imported from Lithuania, is size 10 and 650 yards long and weighs about 100 grams. You can use it like cotton thread but note that the texture is different. Recently I have started to learn how to knit and love using the Flax Linen threads for my knitting.

lynscrafts yarns 11 2 crop
Flax Linen Crochet Thread

For more information on Flax Linen Crochet Thread, see our blog post: Ever heard of Flax Linen Crochet Thread? Here are 5 key things to know about it.

Patterns

Are you ready to get started with crochet thread and need a free pattern? We have over a hundred free patterns on our website, many of which use crochet thread. Since we are a reseller for Aunt Lydia’s, Patons, and other Yarnspriations brands, we are allow to distribute their free patterns on our website. All of the patterns are unaltered in any way. Follow this link to see our free patterns.

For something a bit different, you can purchase any of my premium patterns. I have a passion for plants and flowers and have created several décor patterns. You can find them listed here.

Conclusion

Well there you have it, my beginners guide to crochet thread. I know there are lot of links in this post, but I hope you don’t mind. The linked post provide more dept and detail than I could add here. As you can tell I have a passion for crochet thread and hope that you will find it as useful and rewarding as I have. There is really no limit to what you can do with thread, just use your imagination.

If you made this far you are a trooper. I know this is a long post but I had a lot to share about my passion for crochet threads. As always, thanks for taking the time to read my blog and stay safe!

Thanks,

Lyn

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